Innovative brand extensions

There are loads of textbook examples describing successful brand extensions. I would say that the Virgin enterprises of today will serve as a good example of a successful branching out from the original Virgin branded vinyl recordings. Coca-Cola famously extended the brand to include also Diet Coke in 1982 and IKEA is also the number one Swedish exporter of food products.Peddy2

Artist and designer Peddy Mergui takes the concept of brand extension further than this and to a new level. In an amazing, challenging and also made up series of cleverly designed packaging solutions for famous brands. Famous brands that today are active far away from the here suggested categories.Peddy1

In a design museum in San Francisco the entire line of exciting and thought provoking packaging was displayed. Peddy gives us his view of what milk from Apple would look like, or a salami from Louis Vuitton and how yogurt from Tiffany could be packed. If you ever wondered what pickles by Gucci would look like, go to the exhibition web site.

A brand is expressed through its packaging and this artist will support us thinking out of the box and straight into the container.

I need to go down to the store for some bread and milk. But I can’t find my Google glasses…

Or, are we finally technology mature enough?

Interpreting the results from a new IGD study the answer to the question is probably to be understood as “we are getting there”. We are not quite there but I am really impressed to hear the 43% of the respondents could see themselves using wearable technology when shopping for food and groceries. The respondents are in this case representing the UK but I would like to think of this as an indication.

This is good news for the digital technology industry. But it’s great news for all interested in smart and intelligent packaging. There are many interesting solutions available to get food packaging to communicate with the consumer. But the obstacle and main requirement for this to actually start happen is to have a receiver. That is somebody who is willing to listen to the communicating milk bottle on the shelf.

We can imagine that the shopper today has a smart phone which can be used for communication with smart packaging. The downside is that it involves an active and engaged operator. You cannot expect the average consumer to scrutinize every item using their phone in the supermarket aisles. This is a completely different thing when you have devices like smart glasses, smart watches or similar.

The interviewed consumers say that they are interested in finding better deals using the Google glasses. But printed electronics on packaging will also inform them about best before dates, product content, suggested usage and much more.

Consumers better informed at point of sale will also be good for the food waste problem.

smart glasses

Can packaging persuade you to eat more insects, bugs and creepy-crawlers?

Now that’s an interesting question. I would say yes it can and if you throw in a better word for these creatures you will increase your chances to build a market.

In a FAO report from last year it’s made clear that we need to get used to the idea of getting protein and nutrition from insects. As a matter of fact crickets have more vitamins and minerals and as much protein as chicken. And that with a much smaller carbon footprint. Not bad.

This sounds great but is still in most consumers eyes, appalling. It is however estimated that as many as 2 billion people are already into the habit of eating insects. The challenge is to get a foothold with insect based food on the markets in the developed world.  There are a few brave suppliers but without a general distribution it’s hard. To build up the demand I think you need to leave the packaging design often used today. That is with illustrations of what’s inside. A picture is worth a thousand words… so be careful with the message.

creepies

 

I think that the best example I have seen so far, from a packaging point of view, is what they are doing at SexyFood i Paris. They are using the good old food can but smarting it up with a label that communicates luxury and gourmet food. Black is the colour and some gold added for effect. No illustrations of the worms, crickets and bugs you will find inside. They are even playing down the content by naming their products with numbers rather than names. Stewed worms with added cockroach or number 9. Which sounds better?

I don’t think their products yet has made a big difference but they do show the way when it comes to packaging design. Use the power of packaging, but aim before firing.

creepies2

 

 

QR codes are just sooo 2013

I think we can all agree on that it is getting difficult to read the label of almost anything you find in your fridge. There is simply not a lot of printable space on the average pack. As a producer you have a formidable challenge to inspire and inform the consumer on how to enjoy the contents. Any product manager could talk for hours about a product but now you need to minimize the font size and be fast to the point.

LabelThat’s boring, so all of us who are not in corn flakes or milk are following the advances in printable technologies, printed electronics, nfc, rfid, etc. that will enable us to communicate with consumers using the packaging. For instance through a smart phone. This is a busy corner in the R&D world with quite a lot of really exciting developments to follow.

While waiting for a serious breakthrough on the printed electronics area we are for example using QR codes to communicate more complex ideas. That works fine with a smart phone but only if you as a  broadcaster think of content and it is not enough to direct a consumer to the company web site…

ClickPaper

Then clickable paper entered the stage offering just about the same but now without the rather massive and bulky QR code. Clickable paper technology offers recognition of any printed surface and when activated, that is pointed at with a smartphone, takes you to a set destination or two.
It is an improvement and we are getting there step by step. These are very exciting times but I would still keep that appointment with the optician, at least for now.