Innovation shortcut

I see that 60% of the people in the UK only drink one glass of water a day and only 20% drink more than two. Source: Kantar Worldpanel. As a rule of thumb we need to get 2 litres of fluid a day to stay happy and in balance. It has then rather to be two proper jugs to meet the required amount. I don’t think the British, in this aspect, are very much different than the rest of at least north Europe.

Life is luckily not all water but water drinking could be made more interesting. For Green Sheepinstance by using more exciting packaging that gets your attention and also makes sense. I think that Chicago based Green Sheep Water are making an interesting move by launching an aluminium water bottle. Half a litre is the size and it quite stands out in the shelf, or wherever you find it.

Their point is that this is a more sustainable packaging solution as aluminium is indefinitely recyclable compared to PET and other materials. That is as long as people return the empties…  Besides that it catches the attention at POS and could maybe even prove practical to refill.

I very much like the idea of an innovation shortcut by using an existing idea from another category and apply it on your product. Voila! You have a new and innovative product. Just by being inspired from another field.

The consumer is king

Bouteille_Wattwiller_a_personnaliser-ea5ffThe consumer is the final POS decision maker, now also made able to put the final touch to the label according to mood, need or whim. That is what I call an individual water bottle.

Wattwiller, French mineral water brand, made labels with left out space for the consumer to add their own text or draw pictures.

When making creative packaging it isn’t always you that have to be the creative one. Sometimes you can apparently get off the hook by letting the consumer do the job.

http://www.wattwiller.com/Bouteille-Wattwiller-a

See through Carton

Elopak is together with Sainsbury’s launching a see through Pure Pak carton for juice. Four transparent windows placed on one side of the 1 litre package gives the consumer control over dosing the desired portion. The consumer can also easily visually see when it’s
time for replenishment of the home stock. Plus the more subconscious satisfaction
you get when actually seeing what’s in the package you are buying. http://bit.ly/qnrpUS

Now there is only the beverage can left to have a hole drilled for us to steal a look at the brew.

The bigger the better…?

We are getting bigger, no doubt. This obesity pandemic is putting pressure on health care systems throughout the world. There is obviously a cost related to this, both an individual personal one and an actual monetary.

The medical costs are easier to distinguish and calculate. According to McKinsey the United Kingdom spent more than £4 billion on obesity-related medical costs in 2007. The United States currently spends about $160 billion which is twice what it did a decade ago.

Now these numbers only represent a fraction of the pandemic’s total economic burden on societies. The graph below specifies the different actual costs to society and the individual and shows the final cost which is a stunning $450 billion annually in the US.



Packaging can support diets simply by sizing up portions of adequate size. It can of course also carry messages to encourage the person who needs a push to limit intake and get away from some weight.

Then I see the new cup size to be launched by Starbucks. This can’t be meant to support a healthy diet. Even if you fill it with something as neutral as tap water it is simply too much for the human to stomach.

I assume it’s meant for sharing…

 

Twist and recycle

I think Evian was the first one out, now about 10 years ago. I am thinking of the PET bottle for water that was structured in a way that made it easier for the consumer to crush the empty bottle into a handy piece of plastic to dispose. But I haven’t seen a lot since, except for the I Lohas bottle from Coca-Cola Japan. http://bit.ly/Xretb

It is a shame because it is such a good idea, to have a packaging solution made for easy disposal. The I Lohas bottle scores even more points by being both light weight and made from plant material. I think the main point is that it is pre made to be easily twisted and compressed into a neat chunk to dispose. This is a packaging feature that strongly underlines the sustainable qualities of a product.

Looks good, feels good…

A sports drink based on coconut water has recently been launched in Chicago in great looking long-neck PET bottles, 20 oz or 59 cl. Greater Than is packed, for the health minded, in panel-less bottles from Amcor, which takes hot fill.

The product comes without artificial flavours, colours, sweeteners, or preservatives. It’s sweetened with a combination of all-natural sweeteners including Stevia. The product line currently includes three flavours: lemon lime, orange, and tropical.

Belu, “the most eco-friendly bottled water in the UK” comes in PLA bottles. That’s great but this might be even better for environmental credentials.

New in September is a 50% recycled PET bottle (rPET) with a massive 46% carbon saving compared to its full PET equivalent. The Belu 500ml bottle uses more recycled plastics than any other plastic bottled water on the market in the UK. Feels good all the way down…