Between a brew and a hard place

The SABMIller/AB-InBev deal seems to go through. This is great but will obviously trigger a few consequences and produce both relative winners and losers. The packaging industry doesn’t necessary have to be one of the latter but it will definitely make things a bit more challenging.

balanceNow this consolidation of the industry is in combination with a micro/craft brewery trend that grows seemingly all over the world creates a market place with two extremes.

The polarisation of the field will give the packaging industry a headache. On the one side we have a few really large customers with an impressive leverage and with logistical and geographical demands never seen before. On the other side we have the really small but rapidly rising producers with limited reach that each demands very few but special bottles/cans/kegs at the time.

These opposing customer demands will have to be addressed and solutions must and will be found. The craft breweries are growing and they have aggregated formed into a significant and fast growing market for kegs and bottles and an even faster growing number of cans. It would be a mistake to not support them with suitable packaging solutions that meets their needs. Even if all the action seems to be in the other end of the field right now…

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Drink management

Coors2Why trust your senses when it’s more fun with technology? We use for instance thermochromic ink to tell us if our beverages are cold yet. It is fun and a great way to interact with consumers. Measuring is exciting and there is a small control freak inside of us all.

Now this thingy is really cool. You put this stick into your beverage and hey presto you get a reading of your drink status. Isvaliber.jpgrael based Valiber has developed a hi-tech “spoon” that can measure not only the temperature but also the sweetness of a beverage. This is great but why stop here?

Their spoons will actually soon be able to provide a measurement for other taste sensations such as how sour, how salty, and how bitter your drinks are.

This is fascinating from more than one perspective. I like the idea of new techBandnology supporting every day life and even improving the way we enjoy consumption.

It also fits so well with our obsession to measure and calculate our other activities such as walking, running, sleeping and more. We could probably live without a fitness band, but why take the risk.

The measuring spoon comes handy when you want to know more about your thirst quencher. But you can on the other hand just as well trust your senses and read the label on the packaging…

From snack to pack – full circle

Material is central for packaging. Packaging research is a good deal about materials where new sources are constantly explored. Renewable sources like corn, wheat, pine trees, shrimp shells and many more are explored for polymeric qualities. This is an exciting field of research with a promising outlook and an industry looking for renewable alternatives.

MarsGerben Stouten at Delft Technical University has taken this one step further. He has found a microorganism that purifies water, and makes bioplastic in the process. He is using waste water from a Mars plant to feed bacteria that can be used to make bioplastic and at the same time the process purifies the water. This result could actually be used to wrap a Mars bar. Brilliant.

http://www.wired.co.uk/magazine/archive/2015/05/start/water-from-waste

Illegal, immoral… and not a bit fun

Counterfeiting is a growing problem, no doubt, and it’s not only about expensive bags, perfume and alcohol. This is also very much a concern for the pharmaceutical industry where dodgy imitations slip into the system. Today the situation is the same or worse for all the above categories, and it’s getting nastier…

fakefoodThe forging and faking is breaking new grounds and is sliding down the price curve. Nothing is sacred and there are fake soft drinks to be found, as there is fake olive oil, not to mention fake milk and wine. The other day a production site for fake alcohol was found in the UK. A plant making fake brand-name vodka was raided in Derbyshire. We are especially grateful these imitators were stopped as they were fortifying their product with anti-freeze…

Europol has during the last couple of months been busy coordinating efforts to curb counterfeiters and have as a result seized a staggering 2500 tonnes of fake food products. The damage is not only to the brand name but forged products can be harmful in other ways as well. Obvious when the product is topped up with anti-freeze or similar.

It not easy to spot the real McCoy as the crooks are rather sophisticated. Not all are though,fakeschampoo some of the taken vodka bottles were giving it away with obvious spelling mistakes on the label. What to do then if you want to take the risk and go further than to your micro brewed beer and locally produced produce?

The problem needs a good solution and that as fast as possible. A fake can seldom be spotted just by looking at the product. There are many suggested ideas for how we can distinguish the bad apple. It seems to be hard to agree on a standard so it better to find a solution that fits your product category. If it is printed electronics, holographic prints, RFID technology, security ink, product numbering, watermarks or invisible printing. It’s not cheap but the alternative is worse.

You will have to add something to the packaging that is hard to copy to make it more antifaketagdifficult or even impossible to copy. Last week Diageo and Thin Film Electronics presented a “smart bottle” with a printed sensor tag. The tag can be read using a smart phone and will convey any information the producer adds to the tag. The read tag will confirm the origin and of course give other interesting information to the consumer. Brilliant.

This is all new and the tag will be properly introduced next week at the electronics conference in Barcelona. This is good news as we need many solutions to this growing problem spreading across food categories. It doesn’t mean that I will stop supporting my local micro brewer but it will make life easier and safer for the consumers of the world. More ideas to make faking brands harder, please.

The power of packaging

Packaging Design

CigI am thinking of the idea of using legislation to control consumer packaging decoration. The power of packaging design has to be restrained to make a product less attractive and hold the consumers back. I am of course referring to tobacco and the ongoing discussions about neutralising the design of the entire category. This says a lot about the power of packaging and of and how graphical design communicates. Australia was first out and this is at present also discussed in Europe.

Packaging PatentsPod

Tread carefully when making packaging design decisions. Nestlé is in court meeting a producer of coffee capsules made to work with Nespresso machines. The argument is about the design of the capsules and the functionality of the machines. Without going into details, it’s again about the inherent power of packaging to make or break. This time a little bit of diplomacy probably would have smoothed things a bit. Playing with packaging is playing with fire.

Packaging Changes

GladPeople apparently care and react to what they think is not quite right, also when it comes to packaging. Glad Wrap has been forced to rework their new packaging design after an uproar of public backlash from unhappy customers. Their mistake was to move the cutter from the base of the box to inside the lid. Shock horror. The consumers didn’t like the change and let Glad know, they got the message and changed things back to “normal”.

Packaging matters and design is over again proving to be a powerful tool.

Innovative brand extensions

There are loads of textbook examples describing successful brand extensions. I would say that the Virgin enterprises of today will serve as a good example of a successful branching out from the original Virgin branded vinyl recordings. Coca-Cola famously extended the brand to include also Diet Coke in 1982 and IKEA is also the number one Swedish exporter of food products.Peddy2

Artist and designer Peddy Mergui takes the concept of brand extension further than this and to a new level. In an amazing, challenging and also made up series of cleverly designed packaging solutions for famous brands. Famous brands that today are active far away from the here suggested categories.Peddy1

In a design museum in San Francisco the entire line of exciting and thought provoking packaging was displayed. Peddy gives us his view of what milk from Apple would look like, or a salami from Louis Vuitton and how yogurt from Tiffany could be packed. If you ever wondered what pickles by Gucci would look like, go to the exhibition web site.

A brand is expressed through its packaging and this artist will support us thinking out of the box and straight into the container.

Small is great

Small scale production seems to always face the same challenge. What to do for packaging? The alternatives are expensive with inflexible conditions and hard to find. That is for starters.

anitas balm

Is 3D printing technology one of the answers? Yes, says Anita Redd who chose to 3D print a unique packaging solution for her product Anita’s Balm. She was having trouble finding a suitable jar and came up with the idea of making one herself. Using 3D technology and a biodegradable material she came up with a unique jar for her product. This gives her product an edge at POS and solves her problem to find a supplier of suitable packaging. As a small scale producer you simply don’t need as many units as the full scale producer.

It might not be for everyone but it will sure be helpful for some.There are no shortcuts for the small scale producer that only needs limited quantities of packaging material. 3D printing is a solution and digital printing is another useful technology for the scale challenged producer. It opens up for personalized packaging or at least unique labels at a reasonable cost.